Seyfarth Synopsis:  The fourth and final key trend from our 14th Annual Workplace Class Action Litigation Report involves rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court.  Over the past few years, the country’s highest court has issued a number of rulings that impacted the prosecution and defense of class actions in significant ways.  Today, we provide readers with an outline of the most important workplace rulings issued by the Supreme Court in 2017, as well as which upcoming decisions employers should watch for in 2018.  Read the full breakdown below!

Over the past decade, the U.S. Supreme Court led by Chief Justice John Roberts increasingly has shaped the contours of complex litigation exposures through its rulings on class action and governmental enforcement litigation issues. Many of these decisions have elucidated the requirements for pursuing employment-related class actions.

The 2011 decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes and the 2013 decision in Comcast Corp. v. Behrend are the two most significant examples. Those rulings are at the core of class certification issues under Rule 23. To that end, federal and state courts cited Wal-Mart in 586 rulings in 2017; they cited Comcast in 238 cases in 2017.

The past year also saw a change in the composition of the Supreme Court in April of 2017, with Justice Neil Gorsuch assuming the seat of Antonin Scalia after his passing in 2016. Given the age of some of the other sitting Justices, President Trump may have the opportunity to fill additional seats on the Supreme Court in 2018 and beyond, and thereby influence a shift in the ideology of the Supreme Court toward a more conservative and strict constructionist jurisprudence. In turn, this is apt to change legal precedents that shape and define the playing field for workplace class action litigation.

Rulings In 2017

In terms of direct decisions by the Supreme Court impacting workplace class actions, this past year was no exception. In 2017, the Supreme Court decided seven cases – three employment-related cases and four class action cases – that will influence complex employment-related litigation in the coming years. The three “game-changers” in 2017 can be seen in the following graphic:

The employment-related rulings included one case brought under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, one ERISA case, and one EEOC case. A rough scorecard of the decisions reflects two distinct plaintiff/worker-side victories, and defense-oriented rulings in five cases.

  • EEOC v. McLane Co., 137 S. Ct. 1159 (2017) – Decided on February 21, 2017, the case involved the applicable standard of appellate review of district court decisions to quash or enforce EEOC subpoenas. The Supreme Court held that the standard must be based on an abuse of discretion, and contrary lower court decisions – which called for de novo review – were rejected. The EEOC has broad statutory authority to issue subpoenas in the course of investigating charges of employment discrimination, and it may seek enforcement of its subpoenas in federal court when employers refuse to comply with them. In that event, the applicable test favors enforcement of the subpoena. The Supreme Court determined that if the charge is proper and the material requested is relevant, the subpoena should be enforced unless the employer can establish that the subpoena is too indefinite, has been issued for an illegitimate purpose, or is unduly burdensome. In sum, the Supreme Court underscored the breadth of the agency’s authority to subpoena information from employers in the course of investigating discrimination charges.
  • Expressions Hair Design, et al. v. Schneiderman, 137 S. Ct. 1144 (2017) – Decided on March 29, 2017, this case involved a class action by a group of New York merchants, arguing that a New York statute that prohibits merchants from charging a surcharge to customers who use credit cards violated the First Amendment because it regulates what they say about their prices. The lower courts had dismissed the suit out of hand, concluding that price regulations regulated conduct alone and thus are immune from scrutiny under the First Amendment. The Supreme Court held that because the statute goes beyond the pure regulation of price sufficiently into the realm of regulating speech, it is subject to scrutiny under the First Amendment. As a result, the case was remanded for further consideration of the validity of the statute under the First Amendment. The ruling is a narrow one, but ensures the continuation of class action litigation over the New York statute.
  • Advocate Health Care Network, et al. v. Stapleton, 137 S. Ct. 1652 (2017) – Decided on June 5, 2017, this ruling determined that pension plans that otherwise meet the definition of a church plan definition under the ERISA can qualify for the exemption without being established by a church. The decision is the culmination of a wave of ERISA class actions brought by employees of religiously affiliated non-profit hospitals who asserted that the employers improperly claimed that their pension plans were ERISA-exempt “church plans.”
  • Microsoft Corp. v. Baker, et al., 137 S. Ct. 1702 (2017) – Decided on June 12, 2017, this ruling determined that the voluntary dismissal of individual claims by class representatives after denial of class certification deprives appellate courts of jurisdiction over review of the underlying class certification decision. The case involved consideration of a strategy for appealing denials of class certification whereby plaintiffs responded to a denial of class certification with a voluntary agreement to dismiss their claims. With that dismissal in hand, they would claim they have a final order that they can appeal, planning to revive their claims if the appeal reversed the certification order. The Supreme Court unanimously rejected this practice. It held that plaintiffs in putative class actions cannot transform a tentative interlocutory order into a final judgment simply by dismissing their claims with prejudice – subject, no less, to the right to revive those claims if the denial of class certification was reversed on appeal. The ruling should help corporate defendants in defeating piece-meal attacks on favorable class certification orders.
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., et al. v. Superior Court Of California, 137 S. Ct. 1773 (2017) – Decided on June 19, 2017, this opinion established limitations on personal jurisdiction over non-resident plaintiffs in “mass actions,” a litigation strategy often utilized by plaintiffs’ class action lawyers to sue corporations in plaintiff-friendly jurisdictions that have little to no connection with the dispute. The Supreme Court determined that the requisite connection between the corporate defendant and the litigation forum must be based on more than a combination of the company’s connections with the state and the similarity of the claims of the resident plaintiffs and the non-resident claimants. The ruling reversed a lower court decision that hundreds of plaintiffs who sued a corporation in California state court over alleged injuries associated with a corporation’s product could not sue in that state because they were not residents. In effect, it reversed a decision of the California Supreme Court and directed the dismissal of 592 non-California claims from 33 other states. The ruling has significant implications for the location and scope of class action litigation. As a result, the ruling supports the view that plaintiffs cannot simply “forum shop” in large class actions, and instead must sue where the corporate defendant has significant contacts for purposes of general jurisdiction or limit the class definition to residents of the state where the lawsuit is filed. It should provide some measure of protection to corporations that often are hauled into plaintiff-friendly jurisdictions across the country to which they have nor the plaintiffs suing them had any connection.
  • CalPERS, et al. v. ANZ Securities, Inc., 137 S. Ct. 2042 (2017) – Decided on June 26, 2017, this decision involved a relatively technical question regarding the right to opt-out of a class action – when plaintiffs file a class action, are members of the class entitled to opt-out and represent themselves, and how statutes of limitations work in that situation. Federal securities laws include two different kinds of filing deadlines for claims about misrepresentations in connection with the issuance of securities, including a one-year deadline running from the discovery of the untrue statement and an outside three-year deadline running from the date on which the statement was made. The Supreme Court held that tolling under American Pipe applies only to the one-year deadline, not the three-year deadline. Applying that rule, it barred the action brought in this case by CalPERS, which had opted-out of a large class action brought against Lehman Brothers; the original action was brought in a timely manner, but CalPERS did not opt-out of that action until more than three years after the challenged statements. The ruling closes off a tactic of successive class claims by barring the traditional power of lower federal courts to modify statutory time limits in the name of equity despite any practical obstacles this creates in class actions.
  • Czyzewski, et al. v. Jevic Holding Co., 137 S. Ct. 973 (2017) – Decided on March 22, 2017, this case involved the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (“WARN”) Act and the interplay between worker rights under that statute and the rights of creditors in bankruptcy proceedings after a company allegedly violates the WARN Act. In considering whether priority in distributing assets in bankruptcy may proceed in a manner that allegedly violates the priority scheme in the Bankruptcy Code, the Supreme Court held that such a distribution is improper and priority rules may not be evaded in Chapter 11 structured dismissals. The Supreme Court’s ruling protects workers with WARN claims and bars priority deviations in bankruptcies implemented through non-consensual structured dismissals.

The decisions in Advocate Health Care Network, Baker, Bristol-Myers, CalPERS, Expressions Hair Designs, Jevic, and McLane Co. are sure to shape and influence workplace class action litigation and government enforcement litigation in a profound manner. Theses rulings will impact standing concepts and jurisdictional challenges, liability under the WARN and the ERISA, appeals of class certification decisions, challenges to EEOC administrative subpoenas, and rules on American Pipe tolling and application of statute of limitations in class actions. To the extent that extrinsic restrictions on class actions – i.e., limits on the ability of representative plaintiffs to appeal certification orders (as in Baker), and jurisdictional restrictions on bringing cases in “plaintiff-friendly” jurisdictions (as in Bristol-Myers) – were tightened, class actions will become harder to maintain and litigate. On the other hand, McLane Co. is certainly a setback for employers and strengthens the EEOC’s ability to conduct wide-ranging administrative investigations through its subpoena power.

Rulings Expected In 2018

Equally important for the coming year, the Supreme Court accepted five additional cases for review in 2017 – that will be decided in 2018 – that also will impact and shape class action litigation and government enforcement lawsuits faced by employers.

Those cases include three employment lawsuits and two class action cases. The Supreme Court undertook oral arguments on two of these cases in 2017; the other three will have oral arguments in 2018.

The corporate defendants in each case have sought rulings seeking to limit the use of class actions or raise substantive defenses to class actions or employment-related claims. Further complicating several of these cases, government agencies have either taken opposing stances with each other or reversed positions they held in pervious Supreme Court terms or in the lower court proceedings in these cases.

  • Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, NLRB v. Murphy Oil USA & Ernst & Young LLP v. Morris, 16-285, 16-300 & 16-307 – Argued on October 2, 2017, these three consolidated appeals in employment cases deal with the interpretation of workplace arbitration agreements between employers and employees and whether class action waivers within such agreements – which require workers to arbitrate any claims on an individual basis (and waive the ability to bring or participate in a class action or collective action) – violate employees’ rights under the National Labor Relations Act to engage in “concerted activities” in pursuit. The Supreme Court’s ultimate decision is likely to have far-reaching implications for litigation of class actions and collective actions. The issue started when the NLRB under the Obama Administration began challenging employers’ use of arbitration agreements with class action waivers. During briefing of the issue before the Supreme Court, The Department of Justice under President Trump opposed the NLRB’s position, and has sided with employers and argued that the Federal Arbitration Act favors the validity and enforcement of arbitration agreements that include class waivers.
  • Cyan, Inc., et al. v. Beaver County Employees Retirement Fund, 15-1439 – Argued on November 28, 2017, this class action case poses the issue of whether federal law bars state courts from hearing certain securities class actions. The case turns on interpretation of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 – which imposes tougher standards on securities class actions brought in federal courts – and if it mandates that state courts can no longer hear class actions based on the Securities Act of 1933. The ultimate ruling by the Supreme Court will impact what many view as a “cottage industry” of state court-based class action filings in states such as California where class action lawyers target public companies with securities claims over drops in stock process.
  • Encino Motors, LLC v. Navarro, et al., 16-1362 – In this case, the Supreme Court will examine whether service advisors at car dealerships are exempt under 29 U.S.C. § 213(b)(10)(A) from the overtime pay provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The future ruling in the case may have far-reaching implications on the legal tests for interpretation of statutory exemptions under the FLSA. A broader reading of the exemption potentially could reduce the number of workers allowed to assert wage & hour claims against their employers. The case is set for argument on January 17, 2018.
  • Janus, et al. v. AFSCME, 16-1466 – In this employment case, the Supreme Court will consider whether Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, 431 U.S. 209 (1977), should be overruled and public-sector “agency shop” arrangements invalidated under the First Amendment so as to prevent public-sector unions from collecting mandatory fees from non-members. In deciding the constitutionality of “fair share fees” being imposed on public-sector employees as a condition of employment, the Supreme Court’s future ruling likely will impact millions of workers in 22 states that do not have right-to-work laws. Since many workers are apt to cease paying union dues if the fair share fee payments requirement is abolished, the future ruling will have a significant impact on the ability of public-sector unions to conduct their business. The case is set for oral argument on February 26, 2018.
  • Resh, et al. v. China Agritech, Inc., 17-432 – In this class action case, the Supreme Court will examine whether the tolling rule for class actions established in American Pipe & Construction Co. v. Utah, 414 U.S. 538 (1974), tolls the statute of limitations to permit a previously absent class member to bring a subsequent class action outside the applicable limitations period. In American Pipe, the Supreme Court held that the filing of a class action tolls the running of the statute of limitations for all putative members of the class who make timely motions to intervene after the lawsuit is deemed inappropriate for class action status. In essence, a future ruling in this case will limit or expand the tolling rule in American Pipe to apply only to subsequent individual claims or if it is expanded broadly to successive class actions where plaintiffs were unnamed class members in failed class actions. The case has yet to be set for oral argument.

The Supreme Court is expected to issue decisions in these five cases in 2018.

Implications For Employers

Each decision outlined above may have significant implications for employers and for the defense of high-stakes class action litigation. Further, the decision in Epic Systems / E & Y / Murphy Oil may well end up being one of the most significant rulings for employers since Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes in 2011. Employers have to keep a close eye on this case, since the decision may shift the class action landscape in terms of the ability of employees to bring suit against a company. As always, we will closely monitor all Supreme Court case developments and report them to our readers. Stay tuned!

A seemingly innocuous recruitment text message from the United States Navy has led to the official unraveling of a tactic long-used and widely-favored by defendants to escape a class action lawsuit before class certification. In a 6-3 decision, the United States Supreme Court rejected the argument that an unaccepted settlement offer or offer of judgment moots a plaintiff’s claim and thus a class action as well.

Background and Procedural History

In Campbell-Ewald Company v. Gomez, Petitioner, Campbell-Ewald Company, was retained by the United States Navy to conduct a multimedia recruitment campaign aimed at young adults. One branch of this campaign included sending text messages to potential recruits encouraging them to consider the Navy. The Navy approved the text messages as long as they were only sent to those who “opted-in” to receive marketing materials.

Campbell then contracted with another company, Mindmatics LLC, to identify cell-phone users between 18 and 24 years old who had consented to receiving text messages from the Navy. In May of 2006, Mindmatics transmitted the Navy’s recruitment text to over 100,000 recipients.

One of those recipients was the Respondent, Jose Gomez. Gomez was, at the time, a 40-year-old man who had not consented to receiving text messages from the Navy. Gomez alleged that Campbell violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), which “prohibits any person, absent the prior express consent of a telephone-call recipient, from “mak[ing] any call . . . using any automatic telephone dialing system . . . to any telephone number assigned to a paging service [or] cellular telephone service.” 47 U.S.C. §227(b)(1)(A)(iii).

Gomez filed a class action complaint in the District Court for the Central District of California seeking treble and statutory damages, costs, and attorney’s fees, as well as an injunction against Campbell’s involvement in unsolicited messaging.  Prior to the deadline for filing a motion for class certification, Campbell made a Rule 68 offer of judgment that included paying Gomez his costs excluding attorneys’ fees, $1,503 per message received and an injunction which barred Campbell from sending text messages in violation of the TCPA, but denied any liability. Gomez did not accept the offer. Before Gomez filed his motion for class certification, Campbell filed a motion to dismiss, arguing the district court lacked subject matter jurisdiction over the matter since no case or controversy remained now that Gomez had been provided with complete relief for his injury, and thus the putative class claims also became moot. The district court denied the motion.

Campbell subsequently filed a motion for summary judgment, arguing the U.S. Navy enjoys sovereign immunity from the TCPA and that as a contractor for the Navy, Campbell acquired that immunity. The district court agreed and dismissed the case. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the lower court, holding that Campbell was not entitled to sovereign immunity and that an unaccepted Rule 68 offer of judgment does not moot an individual claim or a class action. The Supreme Court granted certiorari to settle a disagreement amongst the courts of appeals as to whether a Rule 68 offer of judgment does or does not moot a plaintiff’s claim.

The Supreme Court Opinion

Adopting Justice Kagan’s reasoning from her dissenting opinion in Genesis HealthCare Corp. v. Symczyk (in which the Court reserved the issue of whether an offer of judgment moots a claim) the Court found that, “[w]hen a plaintiff rejects such an offer—however good the terms—her interest in the lawsuit remains just what it was before. And so too does the court’s ability to grant her relief. An unaccepted settlement offer—like any unaccepted contract offer—is a legal nullity, with no operative effect.”

The Court further reasoned that once the offer expired, the parties remained adversaries, as both retained the same stake in the litigation they had at the outset. The Court noted that Rule 68 provides that an unaccepted offer is only admissible when determining costs, and for no other reason.

Since Gomez’s individual claim still stood, the Court ruled “a would-be class representative with a live claim of her own must be accorded a fair opportunity to show that certification is warranted.”

Of note, however, is the caveat offered by the Court at the end of its analysis, in which it reserves ruling on a hypothetical situation in which “a defendant deposits the full amount of the plaintiff’s individual claim in an account payable to the plaintiff, and the court then enters judgment for the plaintiff in that amount.”

The Court also rejected Campbell’s sovereign immunity argument, determining that it did not follow the Navy’s implicit instructions to confirm the messages complied with the TCPA.

Conclusion and Implications

The Supreme Court’s ruling settles once and for all the effect of an unaccepted Rule 68 offer of judgment or settlement offer on a plaintiff’s claim. However, the Court appears to have left the door cracked for defendants via its unanswered hypothetical on the possibility of depositing the full amount of plaintiff’s claim into a bank account payable to the plaintiff. While it is unclear how the Court would rule in such a case, it will not likely be long before a defendant tests the waters.

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its highly-anticipated opinion in  DirecTV, Inc. v. Imburgia et al., 577 U.S. ___ (2015), which reaffirmed its ruling in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion, 56 U.S. 333 (2011), dealing yet another blow to California Courts’ attempts to invalidate class action waivers.

Background

The plaintiffs in Imburgia filed their lawsuit in 2008, arguing that class action arbitration waivers were per se unenforceable in California under Discover Bank v. Super. Ct., 36 Cal. 4th 148, 162-163 (2005).  Under the Discover Bank rule, California courts were free to find such provisions, when contained consumer contracts of adhesion, unconscionable and to rule that they should not be enforced. Id.

The DirecTV service agreement at issue in Imburgia provided for arbitration of customer disputes and included a class action waiver but also stated that “[i]f . . . the law of your state would find this agreement to dispense with class arbitration procedures unenforceable, then this entire [arbitration waiver] is unenforceable.”  While the Imburgia case was pending, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Concepcion, which ruled that the Discover Bank rule was preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”).  Despite Concepcion, the California Court of Appeals still found the class action waiver provision in the DirecTV service agreement unenforceable under the theory that the parties had chosen the law of California to govern at the time of drafting and, absent federal preemption, California law would not enforce such provisions.

Opinion

Justice Breyer delivered the opinion of the Court, which began with this “elementary” lesson:  “The Federal Arbitration Act is the law of the United States, and Concepcion is an authoritative interpretation of that Act.  Consequently, the judges of every State must follow it.”  (Slip Op. at 5). Unsurprisingly, the Supreme Court went on to rule that the California Court’s failure to do so indicated that it was not placing arbitration contracts “on equal footing with other contracts” and had therefore run afoul of the FAA.  (Id. at 10-11).

Justice Ginsburg and Justice Sotomayor dissented, opining that, given the specific language of the service agreement and the fact that it was drafted before Concepcion, the state court was free to interpret the contract as it had, and to find the class action arbitration waiver unenforceable.  (See Ginsburg Dissent at 3).  They also lamented that the Court’s recent decisions in Concepcion and Italian Colors had effectively deprived “consumers’ rights to seek redress for losses” and “insulated powerful economic interests.”  (Id. at 10-11).

Implications

Imburgia eliminates any doubt as to the enforceability of class action arbitration waivers.  Retailers and service providers wishing to avoid class action claims are encouraged to include them in their contracts and to be aggressive in enforcing them in litigation, even in the face of arguably ambiguous language.

By Scott M. Pearson, Jeffrey A. Berman, Eric M. Lloyd and Kiran Aftab Seldon

On May 29, 2014, the California Supreme Court issued its much-anticipated opinion in Duran v. U.S. Bank, vacating a $15 million judgment in a wage-hour class action where the court found liability based on a flawed statistical sampling.  Although the Court did not completely reject the use of statistical sampling to establish class-wide liability, it significantly limited the circumstances in which sampling is available.  Most importantly, the Court held that sampling may not be used when it deprives a defendant of its due process right to present affirmative defenses as to all class members.  It also reaffirmed plaintiffs’ burden of establishing manageability in order to certify a class, as well as the obligation of courts to decertify classes that prove to be unmanageable.

The plaintiffs in Duran alleged that U.S. Bank had misclassified certain employees as “outside salespersons” who are exempt from overtime and other requirements because they spend more than 50% of their working time making sales outside the office.  Although declarations from putative class members showed that some class members met the 50% requirement and others did not, the trial court certified a class.  It then adopted a trial plan in which a purportedly random sample of 20 class members plus two of the named plaintiffs would testify at trial, and both liability and damages would be extrapolated to the entire class from findings based on the sample group.  At trial, the court excluded all evidence that class members outside the sample group were in fact exempt, and concluded based only on the sample evidence that all class members had been misclassified.  It also set damages by extrapolating from the sample despite a 43% margin of error, awarding approximately $15 million to the class.

Affirming the Court of Appeal, which had reversed the trial court, the California Supreme Court agreed that the class should have been decertified and ordered a new trial.  The Court confirmed that a defendant has a due process right to “litigate its statutory defenses to individual claims.”  Thus, “any trial must allow for the litigation of affirmative defenses, even in a class action case where the defense touches upon individual issues.”  If statistical sampling is to be used at all for proving liability in a class action, the Court held, it must comport with due process and use sound methodologies.  In particular, among other things: (a) the sample size must be “sufficiently large to provide reliable information about the larger group,” (b) the sample must be random and free of selection bias, and (c) the approach must yield results within a reasonable margin of error.  Furthermore, trial courts should evaluate any proposals for statistical sampling before certifying a class, and they must decertify classes that prove unmanageable.

Although Duran unfortunately did not completely reject the use of statistical sampling to establish classwide liability, it does make it significantly more difficult for plaintiffs to use that approach.  It also will help defendants opposing class certification, as it reaffirms the requirement that class litigation be manageable, which too often is ignored in lower courts.

By Scott M. Pearson and Daniel Joshua Salinas

California’s Consumers Legal Remedies Act and Unfair Competition Law (Business and Professions Code Section 17200) both are notorious for allowing plaintiffs’ class action lawyers to bring extortionate lawsuits based on technical statutory violations or conduct that arguably is “unfair.”  On May 1, 2014, the California Supreme Court weakened those statutes, holding that neither may be used by consumers to challenge sales tax reimbursement charges.  Loeffler v. Target Corp.,No. S173972, 2014 WL 1714947 (Cal. May 1, 2014).

In Loeffler, plaintiffs brought a class action against the defendant retailer seeking to recover sales tax reimbursements they paid for “to go” hot coffee, which they contend is not taxable.  Affirming the lower courts’ dismissal of the action without leave to amend, the Supreme Court held that consumers have no standing to challenge sales tax reimbursement charges, as it is the retailer, not the consumer, who is the taxpayer; and the Board of Equalization has primary jurisdiction over tax matters.  An action by consumers under the CLRA and UCL, the court held, would undermine both the Board’s primary jurisdiction and the tax code’s safe harbor for reimbursements for sales tax that has been remitted to the state.  Consumers may, however, seek injunctive relief ordering retailers to seek reimbursement from the Board of Equalization under Javor v. State Board of Equalization, 12 Cal. 3d 790 (1974).

In addition to undermining the increasingly frequent lawsuits premised on erroneous sales tax charges, Loeffler may have broader impact because it applied two existing defenses to UCL claims — primary jurisdiction and abstention in matters of complex economic policy — to the CLRA.  See, e.g., Farmers Ins. Exch. v. Superior Court, 2 Cal. 4th 377, 394 (1992) (primary jurisdiction); Beasley v. Wells Fargo Bank, 235 Cal. App. 3d 1383, 1391 (1991) (abstention).  In the wake of Proposition 64, the CLRA has effectively replaced the UCL as the California class action plaintiff’s weapon of choice.  The application of these defenses to CLRA claims therefore is a welcome development for defendants in consumer class actions.

 

On Thursday, May 29, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. Central, Robert Milligan, Joseph Marra and Joshua Salinas will present the first installment of Seyfarth’s 2014 Class Action Webinar series, our class action attorneys will discuss how plaintiffs’ attorneys are increasingly filing class actions in California seeking to apply the state’s privacy laws to routine telephone communications between businesses and their customers.

Companies located outside of California are not immune: These privacy laws arguably encompass any call made to or received by someone located in California. If your company records or monitors inbound or outbound telephone calls with customers or employees, you need to attend this webinar.

California privacy laws seemingly couple stringent compliance requirements with staggering liability damages. Aggregating damages in a class action context can quickly place exposure figures in the millions of dollars for even innocent but alleged technical violations of the statutes. Recent case law has influenced the attractiveness of these claims, and companies should take proactive measures to protect themselves against these suits now. The Seyfarth panel will specifically address the following topics:

  • Understanding the California Invasion of Privacy Act (“CIPA”) and why these claims are so enticing for plaintiffs’ attorneys, including Penal Code Section 632 and 632.7 claims; • Recent case law that has strengthened plaintiff’s abilities to bring CIPA claims as well as a discussion of typical defenses to such claims;
  • Recent case law that has strengthened companies’ abilities to defend against CIPA class actions;
  • Specific steps a company should take to protect itself against such suits; and
  • Additional mechanisms for limiting exposure and avoid liability under CIPA.

There is no cost to attend this webinar, however, registration is required.

 

First off, Happy New Year to our Blog Readers. Thank you for your patronage last year and we look forward to another year rolling over the legal class action landscape together.

As you may have recognized, either in reading our blog or simply reading the paper, a vast majority of the consumer class docket last year across the country was stuffed with cases brought under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”).  The decisions ran the gamut, from insurance coverage disputes to class certification issues to cy pres conflicts.  The past year also found increased traffic on the administrative side, with nearly a dozen petitions filed with the Federal Communications Commission seeking clarification and assistance in restraining the proliferation of class action litigation under the TCPA.  These petitions seek guidance on the hottest topics being litigated, including: (1) what constitutes an autodialer; (2) whether informational cell phone calls require prior written consent; (3) whether the Act applies to documents transmitted via the Internet; and (4) whether opt-out notices are required on faxes sent with prior express consent.

While this statute created a boom for creative plaintiff’s lawyers, its uncontrolled expansion across the country (watch out New York) has become a drain upon not only the defendants to those suits, but small businesses and even the government.  We have unfortunately witnessed at our firm lawsuits targeting “mom and pop” businesses, apparently brought by plaintiffs with hopes of striking gold through an insurance policy without exclusions.  Further, the Wall Street Journal reported last November that the TCPA has hindered the federal government from efficiently recovering approximately $120 million in unpaid taxes.

Fresh off the New Year, two separate cases are postured to allow the United Supreme Court to address several of pressing issues under the TCPA, as well as to perhaps add some common sense to the interpretation of the statute, as Judge Benitez of the Southern District did late last year.   See Chyba v. First Financial Asset Management, 12-cv-1721 (S.D.N.Y. Nov. 20, 2013).

First, in Turza v. Holtzman, the defendant has petitioned the United States Supreme Court on several bubbling issues, one of which, the availability of cy pres, may be enough to pique the interest of the sitting justices.  Turza is an attorney who sent facsimiles to a purchased list of contacts.  The faxes took the form of a newsletter called the “Daily Plan-It”, which provided industry news and generic legal advice to the recipients.  The bottom portion of the fax provided contact information for Turza.  The lower court found that the faxes were unsolicited advertisements and entered judgement against Turza for $4.2 million, ordering that 1/3 of that amount, or $1.4 million, be paid to the plaintiff’s counsel, with the remaining money constituting a common fund.  Any moneys not claimed, the court held, would be then paid to a cy pres legal aid clinic.  On appeal, the Seventh Circuit upheld the judgment, but remanded to the lower court, taking issue with the designation of the judgment as a common fund, as well as the cy pres designation, but, nonetheless, ordering the solo practitioner to turn over the $4.2 million in a court-maintained account until resolution of the issue on remand.  Turza has now appealed the decision to the United States Supreme Court, challenging not only the issues of the common fund and cy pres, but also the underlying decision related to the designation of the facsimile as an advertisement.  The petition is pending on the United States Supreme Court docket as Case No. 13-760.

Second, in Uesco Industries Inc. et al. v. Poolman of Wisconsin Inc, the plaintiff is seeking a direct appeal to the United States Supreme Court on denial of its motion for class certification.  In Uesco, the defendant was solicited by a marketing agency to utilize the services of that company to send facsimiles.  Ultimately, the defendant acquiesced, but provided explicit instruction on the types of industries it wanted to target.  According to the defendant, against those wishes, the marketing agency sent facsimiles to a larger group of companies, including the plaintiff.  Before the lower court, the defendant argued that no vicarious liability could attach to it, as the marketing company exceeded the scope of its authority.  On appeal, the First District reversed, holding that the express language of the statute, and controlling precedent, required the agent to act within its scope before the defendant could be liable under the TCPA.  The petition is on the United States Supreme Court’s docket as Case No. 13-771.

The new year brings new hope that somewhere, someone will add a pound of sense to the Cerberus-like statute.  In the meantime, we will continue to assist our clients in avoiding the many pitfalls the statute presents, as well as identifying creative solutions to resolving pending litigation.