By Robert B. Milligan and Christina F. Jackson

Plaintiffs’ attorneys have increasingly filed consumer class actions in California seeking to apply the state’s privacy laws to routine communications between businesses and their customers. If a company records or monitors inbound or outbound telephone calls with customers for calls made to or received by someone located

Summary

California Penal Code Section 632 has provided a springboard to litigation related to the recording of telephone calls in the State of California.  Last week, in Hatisihi v. First American, Case No. B244769 (Cal. Ct. App. 2d Dist.), the California Court of Appeal affirmed the recent trend of class certification denials in

“Injury-in-fact is not Mount Everest,” Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito once opined. The threshold to establish constitutional standing — which requires that plaintiffs establish an “injury-in-fact” — is low; so low that in most types of lawsuits, plaintiffs have no trouble scaling the requirement.  While standing may not be Mount Everest, in consumer privacy lawsuits,

Apparently, Chief Justice Roberts has added to the United States Supreme Court’s wish list: a case that would allow the Court to address the “fundamental concerns” surrounding the use of cy pres remedies in class action settlements.

What is Cy Pres?

A cy pres remedy provides indirect benefits to class members (usually through defendant donations

It is often assumed that the statutory penalty in civil actions under California’s Invasion of Privacy Act, Penal Code section 630 et seq. (“CIPA” or “Act”), is $5,000 for each instance of misconduct that violates the Act.  (Some California courts have indeed indicated as much, though in dicta and without analysis.)  Adopting such a

California Penal Code section 632.7 imposes criminal liability and, pursuant to Penal Code section 637.2, civil liability upon persons who intercept or receive a communication involving a cellular or cordless telephone and record the communication without consent.  The section and its sister provision, Penal Code section 632, are popular among class action plaintiffs in California

According to a documentary filmmaker, the answer to that question is a resounding “Yes.”  Last week, Good Morning to You Productions Corp. (“GMTY”), a New York based film company, filed a class action lawsuit seeking to remove any purported copyright protection for the song “Happy Birthday to You,” as well as recovering all allegedly improper

On Tuesday, June 11, 2013, the Seventh Circuit denied comScore’s appeal from the district court’s ruling granting class certification, thereby allowing a class of tens of millions of plaintiffs from around the world to proceed to trial as a class action suit.  In re comScore, Inc., No. 13-8007 (7th Cir. June 11, 2013).

ComScore

On April 8, 2013, the United States District Court for the Central District of California denied the plaintiff’s motion for class certification in Torres v. Nutrisystem, Inc., SACV 12-01854-CJC (JPRx), a lawsuit alleging Nutrisystem violated California Penal Code sections 632 and 632.7.

Penal Code section 632 prohibits the surreptitious recording of confidential communications made over

In its second major decision in two years involving the Song-Beverly Credit Card Act  – which prohibits retailers from obtaining and recording customers’ “personal identification information” as a condition to accepting credit cards for payment of goods or services – the California Supreme Court gave retailers a post-holiday victory when it held in Apple v.