First off, Happy New Year to our Blog Readers. Thank you for your patronage last year and we look forward to another year rolling over the legal class action landscape together.

As you may have recognized, either in reading our blog or simply reading the paper, a vast majority of the consumer class docket last year across the country was stuffed with cases brought under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”).  The decisions ran the gamut, from insurance coverage disputes to class certification issues to cy pres conflicts.  The past year also found increased traffic on the administrative side, with nearly a dozen petitions filed with the Federal Communications Commission seeking clarification and assistance in restraining the proliferation of class action litigation under the TCPA.  These petitions seek guidance on the hottest topics being litigated, including: (1) what constitutes an autodialer; (2) whether informational cell phone calls require prior written consent; (3) whether the Act applies to documents transmitted via the Internet; and (4) whether opt-out notices are required on faxes sent with prior express consent.

While this statute created a boom for creative plaintiff’s lawyers, its uncontrolled expansion across the country (watch out New York) has become a drain upon not only the defendants to those suits, but small businesses and even the government.  We have unfortunately witnessed at our firm lawsuits targeting “mom and pop” businesses, apparently brought by plaintiffs with hopes of striking gold through an insurance policy without exclusions.  Further, the Wall Street Journal reported last November that the TCPA has hindered the federal government from efficiently recovering approximately $120 million in unpaid taxes.

Fresh off the New Year, two separate cases are postured to allow the United Supreme Court to address several of pressing issues under the TCPA, as well as to perhaps add some common sense to the interpretation of the statute, as Judge Benitez of the Southern District did late last year.   See Chyba v. First Financial Asset Management, 12-cv-1721 (S.D.N.Y. Nov. 20, 2013).

First, in Turza v. Holtzman, the defendant has petitioned the United States Supreme Court on several bubbling issues, one of which, the availability of cy pres, may be enough to pique the interest of the sitting justices.  Turza is an attorney who sent facsimiles to a purchased list of contacts.  The faxes took the form of a newsletter called the “Daily Plan-It”, which provided industry news and generic legal advice to the recipients.  The bottom portion of the fax provided contact information for Turza.  The lower court found that the faxes were unsolicited advertisements and entered judgement against Turza for $4.2 million, ordering that 1/3 of that amount, or $1.4 million, be paid to the plaintiff’s counsel, with the remaining money constituting a common fund.  Any moneys not claimed, the court held, would be then paid to a cy pres legal aid clinic.  On appeal, the Seventh Circuit upheld the judgment, but remanded to the lower court, taking issue with the designation of the judgment as a common fund, as well as the cy pres designation, but, nonetheless, ordering the solo practitioner to turn over the $4.2 million in a court-maintained account until resolution of the issue on remand.  Turza has now appealed the decision to the United States Supreme Court, challenging not only the issues of the common fund and cy pres, but also the underlying decision related to the designation of the facsimile as an advertisement.  The petition is pending on the United States Supreme Court docket as Case No. 13-760.

Second, in Uesco Industries Inc. et al. v. Poolman of Wisconsin Inc, the plaintiff is seeking a direct appeal to the United States Supreme Court on denial of its motion for class certification.  In Uesco, the defendant was solicited by a marketing agency to utilize the services of that company to send facsimiles.  Ultimately, the defendant acquiesced, but provided explicit instruction on the types of industries it wanted to target.  According to the defendant, against those wishes, the marketing agency sent facsimiles to a larger group of companies, including the plaintiff.  Before the lower court, the defendant argued that no vicarious liability could attach to it, as the marketing company exceeded the scope of its authority.  On appeal, the First District reversed, holding that the express language of the statute, and controlling precedent, required the agent to act within its scope before the defendant could be liable under the TCPA.  The petition is on the United States Supreme Court’s docket as Case No. 13-771.

The new year brings new hope that somewhere, someone will add a pound of sense to the Cerberus-like statute.  In the meantime, we will continue to assist our clients in avoiding the many pitfalls the statute presents, as well as identifying creative solutions to resolving pending litigation.